A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

By Hiroyuki Yanagihashi (The University of Tokyo) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

By Metin M. Coşgel (University of Connecticut) & Boğaç A. Ergene (University of Vermont) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar … Continue reading Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

By Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University in Qatar) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Writing Islamic Legal History

By Rula J. Abisaab (McGill University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Scholars … Continue reading Writing Islamic Legal History

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Intisar Rabb (Harvard Law School; Editor-in-Chief, Islamic Law Blog), Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia), Joel Blecher (George Washington University), Saadia Yacoob (Williams College), and Joshua White (University of Virginia) were brought together by the Ottoman History Podcast to discuss the question "What is Islamic Law?" in the first episode of a forthcoming series of podcasts … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence

By Omar Farahat A question that classical Muslim jurisprudents debated vigorously was: how do we undertake our duties when divine commands only give general guidelines in relation to time, or no time-specific determinations at all? At the heart of this question is how divine speech, mediated by the work of jurisprudents, should be seen to … Continue reading Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence

A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

By Omar Farahat It is common knowledge that substantive Islamic laws are constituted of juristic pronouncements (aḥkām) on a wide range of actions, abstentions, and their possible consequences. Internally, we might say, these pronouncements of the jurists assume a sense of authority given their relation to divine revelation. The pronouncements or rulings of the jurists … Continue reading A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

The 43rd annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture organized by Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law hosted our Editor-in-Chief, Intisar Rabb, with her presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law." The presentation concerned the Mamlūk Empire during the thirteenth century, with a focus on the judicial overhaul overseen by its Sultan Baibars I. In her presentation, … Continue reading On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law