Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Thursday, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) unanimously held that Greece owed a Greek woman by the name of Molla Sali 51,000 euros ($57,000) in damages plus expenses “for siding with her late husband’s two sisters and for applying ‘Sharia law to a section of its citizens against their wishes.’” This judgment follows a 2018 decision by the same court in Molla … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace

This is part 4 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace Students of Ḥanafī law learn that the crime of murder consists in a deliberate act, aiming at ending a life, by a competent adult, using—and this is where the emphasis is—a proper murder … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 3 :: After the Failure

This is part 3 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 3 :: An Islamic “Law-and-Economics” Jurisprudence Can one suggest the presence (latent or real) of a law-and-economics version of Islamic criminal law? The diya doctrine of financial restitution for injury has features that invite this consideration.  Diya applies, not only to whole human … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 3 :: After the Failure

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust

 This is part 2 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust In this post, I hope to achieve two goals.  First, I want to eliminate any attachment to the notion that punishment in Islamic criminal law is mainly corporeal punishment.  As I provide … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

This is part 1 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 1 :: After the Failure You are the kind of legal scholar who has no patience for trying tactics that lead into predictable problems. You take for granted that criminal acts (as reflection of a criminal capacity) are simply part of human nature, … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Islamic Criminal Jurisprudence on the Offence of Trafficking in Persons: An Interpretation of Fasad fil Arz and Hadd Offence," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal, Muhammad Sohail and Ataullah Khan Mahmood address the topic of Hudood offences and their relationship to Islamic criminal jurisprudence. Raad Mozib Lalon reveals the economic effects … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Recent Scholarship: Akande on British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria

"Secularizing Islam: The Colonial Encounter and the Making of a British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria, 1903–58" by Rabiat Akande. This article narrates the ways in which siyasa, understood as "discretionary powers of political rulers," facilitated the making of a British Colonial Islamic law. Here, Akande focuses on criminal law in order to highlight what set … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Akande on British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria

Lecture Series: Spousal Abuse and Islamic Law Reform

On Mar 28, Professor Mohammad Fadel of the University of Toronto gave a lecture on "Nushuz, Lawful Discipline and Spouse Abuse in the Maliki Madhab: A History and Its Relevance to Modern Islamic Law Reform." He discussed examples of Muslim judges from Mamlūk and Andalusian courts seeking out cases of spousal abuse rather than waiting for those cases to … Continue reading Lecture Series: Spousal Abuse and Islamic Law Reform

In the News: Revkin on ISIS’s Legal System

Last week’s New York Times article on “The Case of the Purloined Poultry: How ISIS Prosecuted Petty Crime” describes the implementation of Islamic criminal law in Iraq under ISIS. According to Mara Revkin of Yale University, providing open and quick access to justice was one way that ISIS tried to distinguish itself from the Iraqi government: “ISIS seemed to … Continue reading In the News: Revkin on ISIS’s Legal System

Commentary :: The Myth of Voluntary Surrendering to Islamic Law: An Analysis of the Lashing of Non-Muslims Under the Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law

This commentary, by Waskito Jati, criticizes the prevailing opinion that non-Muslims who have been lashed in public after violating Islamic criminal law in Aceh have voluntarily surrendered to Islamic law after being given the choice of prosecution under Acehnese Qanun Jinayat, the Indonesian penal code. Article 5 (C) of the Qanun contradicts this opinion by stating … Continue reading Commentary :: The Myth of Voluntary Surrendering to Islamic Law: An Analysis of the Lashing of Non-Muslims Under the Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law