Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Following the beheading of Samuel Paty, a French teacher of civics, for showing caricatures of the Prophet in class during a discussion on French secularism or laicité, French teachers reported finding conversations around the issue to be increasingly difficult and volatile. Japanese Muslims expressed their frustration with the difficulty to find burial facilities and locations … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In her book review for Reading Religion (November 19, 2020) of Tamir Moustafa’s (Simon Fraser University) Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Nurfadzilah Yahaya (National University of Singapore) argues that the book showcases how Islamic law is utilized by the country’s political elites “in the service of Malay … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Details of France’s proposed bill to counter what President Macron called “Islamic separatism” began to emerge: the bill seeks to criminalize disclosing data about a person’s location to those who might do harm, to provide for summary trials for perpetrators of online hate crimes, to empower judges to prevent individuals with a certain criminal history … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Registration Open :: Political Theology Network Conference

"Political Theology” covers a multidisciplinary field of research that engages the unwieldy relationship between religion and politics out of a desire for justice. At the Political Theology Network Conference, we extend this engagement by bringing together scholars, activists, artists, and religious leaders working both inside and outside the academy. This year’s conference will take place … Continue reading Registration Open :: Political Theology Network Conference

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

Last week, US constitutional law professor and SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Asifa Quraishi-Landes wrote about the midterm elections, asking whether Muslim American voters should be guided by sharīʿa or the public good, or both. Quraishi-Landes was also one of the “thought leaders and change-makers” who was invited to speak at the 2018 Muslim Public Affairs Council … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

Case Note: Sarsour v. Trump (E.D. Va. 2017): Upholding the “Muslim Ban” 2.0

Contributed by Katherine Gonzalez. On March 6, 2017, President Donald J. Trump issued a revised Executive Order which barred, with certain exceptions, entry to the United States of nationals from six predominantly Muslim countries, suspended the entry of refugees for 120 days, and reduced the number of refugees who can be admitted to the United … Continue reading Case Note: Sarsour v. Trump (E.D. Va. 2017): Upholding the “Muslim Ban” 2.0

EVENT: The JFK Jr. Forum: A Conversation with Khizr Khan

Khizr Khan at the Harvard Kennedy School's JFK Jr. Forum on February 15th, co-sponsored by ILSP: SHARIAsource. Though the crowd numbered far less than the Democratic National Convention's, Khan was no less eloquent. He recounted for the crowd his experience leading up to the Democratic National Convention and its aftermath. Under Intisar Rabb's, Harvard Law School Professor … Continue reading EVENT: The JFK Jr. Forum: A Conversation with Khizr Khan

ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

On election day 2016, Professor Intisar Rabb, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, reflects on the notion of “civil rights sharīʿa”: the role that Islamic law has historically played in honoring and pressing for shared commitments to justice and equality under the law. Modern American history already exemplifies this notion in the legacy of boxing legend Muhammad Ali, who died as … Continue reading ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

Is Sharīʿa: Medieval or Modern? (NPR Interview with Professor Khaled Abou El Fadl)

In a recent interview aired on NPR, senior scholar Khaled Abou El Fadl disentangles historically-grounded definitions of sharīʿa from public misunderstandings of it. The problems fueling those popular misunderstanding are twofold. First, there is a conceptual problem. Most of the public does not know what sharīʿa means. On a basic level, he defines it as … Continue reading Is Sharīʿa: Medieval or Modern? (NPR Interview with Professor Khaled Abou El Fadl)

CASE WATCH: The ECJ Reviews Opposite Decisions of Employment Discrimination over Wearing Headscarves: What’s at Stake?

Editor-in-Chief Intisar Rabb comments on guest writer Erica Howard's discussion of the ECJ's forthcoming decision. Guest writer Erica Howard discusses the decision facing the European Court of Justice on two cases concerning headscarves worn by Muslim women at work in Belgium and France, respectively, in accord with their beliefs and practice of Islamic law. Two advocates general heard the … Continue reading CASE WATCH: The ECJ Reviews Opposite Decisions of Employment Discrimination over Wearing Headscarves: What’s at Stake?