Religious Accommodation in an Assertively Secular Legal System: Mahr and the Turkish Case

In 1926, the young Turkish Republic abandoned its codified Islamic personal status law and replaced it with the secular Swiss Civil Code.[1] The new republican government, replacing its Ottoman predecessor, also adopted the Swiss Code of Obligations laying out the law of contracts.[2] Both of these legal transplants were part of a larger movement concerned … Continue reading Religious Accommodation in an Assertively Secular Legal System: Mahr and the Turkish Case