Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS After retiring from the NBA, Hakeem Olajuwon launched a successful career in real estate, all the while avoiding borrowing money for his acquisitions that would result in paying or charging interest, which contradicts his faith. Al Barakeh Wheat - a project founded by two Jordanians - teaches people how to … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Islamic fintech, or iFintech, witnessed considerable growth recently, with Malaysia described as "the most robust ecosystem supporting the industry." Online and mobile-first fintech companies, sometimes called "neobanks," are increasingly offering sharī'a-compliant services, in a move to accommodate the needs of their Muslim clientele. While many Afghans continue to fear the … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Petitioning the Sultan: Protests and Justice in Late Ottoman Sultan" (Bloomsbury 2021), Yuval Ben-Bassat (University of Haifa) discusses the institution of petitioning the Ottoman sultan, specifically Abdulhamid II, as a legal remedy in Ottoman Palestine. Abhishek Gupta (Indian Law Institute) discusses Indian Muslims' demand for interest-free Islamic banking in … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

By Mehdi Berriah This is part four in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. As noted by Ibrāhīm b. ʿAlī al-Hanafī al-Ṭarsūsī, the possibility of resorting to the imposition of new taxes or the requisition, on the order of the sultan, of goods to finance a war effort … Continue reading A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

By Mehdi Berriah This is part three in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. In the cases presented in the sources discussed in the previous post, sultans and amīrs met, in general, with firm opposition on the part of several ʿulamāʾ to the imposition of additional taxes on … Continue reading The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Abortion and Rape Laws in Pakistan: A Sharī‘ah Based Analysis" (SSRN, September 17, 2021), Qurratul Minhas (International Islamic University, Islamabad) and Samia Maqbool Niazi (International Islamic University, Islamabad) discuss rulings on rape and abortion in classical Islamic law to point to what they consider to be gaps in current Pakistani laws dealing with the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

By Mehdi Berriah This is part one in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. While the spirit and laws of jihād have often attracted the attention of researchers, this is not the case for its economic aspect, which remains poorly known. It must be kept in mind … Continue reading The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Sharī‘ah-Compliant Equities and Sharī‘ah Screening: Need for Convergence of Ethical Screening of Stocks with Sharī‘ah Screening"  (International Journal of Emerging Markets, forthcoming) Tauhidul Islam Tanin (Monash University) and Faruq Ahmad (Islamic Economics Institute) argue that Islamic finance must incorporate a method whereby "the ethical screening of stocks" is integrated into the screening process for … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Banking on Blind Faith? Islamic Finance, Consumer Protection and Public Policy" (SSRN, February 18, 2021) Faisal Kutty (Valparaiso University Law School) argues that current Islamic finance practices fall short of Islamic ethics and ideals. In "The Promise and Paradox of Women in the Judiciary in Indonesia" (SSRN,  June 1, 2021) Melissa Crouch (University of … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup