Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Ahmadullah, a prominent Muslim cleric from Bangladesh, issued a fatwā stating that using the laughing emoji to mock people is forbidden under Islamic law. Muslim women in Kenya have lobbied the government to ensure that a woman is appointed to the top Kadhi court adjudicating Islamic law matters. A new Pew Research study found that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islam and Data Science Roundup

A recent Pew Research Center study found that "[a]bout eight-in-ten Americans say there is a lot or some discrimination in their society, and two-thirds or more in the UK, Germany and France agree." In "Christians, Muslims and Traditional Worshippers in Nigeria: Estimating the Relative Proportions from Eleven Nationally Representative Social Surveys" (Review of Religious Research, … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

As Somalia continues to debate over what to include in its new constitution and when to hold a referendum on it, women's rights have emerged as a divisive point of discussion among the country's politicians. A former member of the Central Bank of Nigeria has urged the institution to establish a special tribunal to resolve … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In an opinion piece published on the Jurist, entitled "Nigeria court overturns two blasphemy convictions after international outcry" Marie Feyche (U. Pittsburgh School of Law) reports that the High Court of Kano (Nigeria) overturned two blasphemy convictions handed down by a sharī'a court, after international outcry. In "DNA Evidence and the Islamic Law of Paternity … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The High Court of Kano (Nigeria) overturned two blasphemy convictions by a sharī'a court, following weeks of international outcry. The Muslim Spiritual Board of the Republic of Tatarstan launched the "Online Madrasah" project, described as an "online alternative" to popular "sheiks" preaching online.

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Details of France’s proposed bill to counter what President Macron called “Islamic separatism” began to emerge: the bill seeks to criminalize disclosing data about a person’s location to those who might do harm, to provide for summary trials for perpetrators of online hate crimes, to empower judges to prevent individuals with a certain criminal history … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Alkamawa v. Bello and Another: Case Considers the Form and Status of Islamic Law in Northern Nigeria

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Background In the wake of Fulani Sheikh Usman Danfodio’s conquest of Hausaland in 1804, an Islamic legal system was established in what would become … Continue reading Alkamawa v. Bello and Another: Case Considers the Form and Status of Islamic Law in Northern Nigeria

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Amid international outcry after a Nigerian religious court sentenced a 22-year old to death for blasphemous statements made on WhatsApp, a well-known imām (Muslim religious leader) in the country, who believes that the person should be punished, asked for a more lenient sentence. Nigerian Senator Smart Adeyemi announced his intention to advance a bill that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Saudi Ministry of Interior announced that there is no list of specifically prohibited names, but that there are certain criteria “that must be taken into account when choosing the names of children,” providing as examples of prohibited names those that violate Islamic law such as Abd al-Rasool and Abd al-Lat. Bitcoin Association Ambassador for … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Sudan’s bishops celebrated Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok’s declaration officially forbidding the state from establishing a religion, which had been Islam prior to the declaration. While some Muslims in Malaysia called for making it mandatory for women to wear the ḥijāb (or the tudung, as it is called in Malaysia), Maryam Lee, a prominent human … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup