Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS The Department of Justice announced that Stafford County, Virginia recently repealed an ordinance that prevented the development of a cemetery for people of the Islamic faith. Stacker has compiled a list of abortion laws in 15 countries, including Saudi Arabia, where scholars comment it is easier to obtain an abortion … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Islam through Objects" (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021), Anna Bigelow (ed.) (Stanford University) curates a collection of essays on objects in Islam and how these objects, including, for example, prayer beads, rugs, amulets, clothing, shed light on what the author terms "Islamic material culture studies." In "Violence in Early Islam: Religious … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part three in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As the rulers of a vast realm in which Islam was the dominant religion, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate (1250–1517) seem to have considered knowledge about Islamic legal norms … Continue reading Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS After retiring from the NBA, Hakeem Olajuwon launched a successful career in real estate, all the while avoiding borrowing money for his acquisitions that would result in paying or charging interest, which contradicts his faith. Al Barakeh Wheat - a project founded by two Jordanians - teaches people how to … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "The Textual Evolution of the Ottoman Şeyhülislams’ Fetvas: A Cross-Corpora Computational Analysis" (Der Islam 98, no. 2 (2021)), Bogac Ergene (The University of Vermont) and Atabey Kaygun (Istanbul Technical University) "use a mix of computational techniques to identify textual shifts in the Ottoman şeyhülislams’ fetvas between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries." In … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Islamic fintech, or iFintech, witnessed considerable growth recently, with Malaysia described as "the most robust ecosystem supporting the industry." Online and mobile-first fintech companies, sometimes called "neobanks," are increasingly offering sharī'a-compliant services, in a move to accommodate the needs of their Muslim clientele. While many Afghans continue to fear the … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Experiencing ‘nikah Captivity’ in the West: Gendered Conflicts over Ending Muslim Marriages" (Journal of Muslims in Europe, online, September 16, 2021), Anika Liversage (The Danish Center for Social Science Research), based on a series of interviews with Muslim women, finds that second-generation Muslims in Denmark are more easily able … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part one in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. Many students of Islamic history are fascinated by the unusual polity that ruled Egypt, Syria, and neighboring regions from about 1250 to 1517 CE. This political entity was dominated by a small elite group … Continue reading Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Following the Taliban's rise to power, many law students and lawyers from Afghanistan have reported that "[i]t is not the application of Islamic criminal law that frightens [them], it is that it is applied without due process." Haroun Rahimi, a self-exiled Afghan who was a professor of law at Kabul … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup