Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

New debates about Islam in Europe

Talib Shareef, Yaya J. Fanusie, and Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, three African American Muslims with experience in a diverse array of American institutions, including the US Air Force, the CIA, and the Department of Homeland Security, respectively, recently wrote an article in Foreign Policy.  There, the authors cite and evaluate the existing narratives in circulation on Islam … Continue reading New debates about Islam in Europe

Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence

By Omar Farahat A question that classical Muslim jurisprudents debated vigorously was: how do we undertake our duties when divine commands only give general guidelines in relation to time, or no time-specific determinations at all? At the heart of this question is how divine speech, mediated by the work of jurisprudents, should be seen to … Continue reading Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Quoted in an article appearing in the Wall Street Journal titled "Vienna Shooting Suspect Had Previous Terrorism Conviction," past Program in Islamic Law fellow and professor of Islamic law at Vienna University Ebrahim Afsah takes issue with state interventions across Europe to "stop the spread of Islamism." Afsah contends that European states create counterproductive results … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Criticism of French President Macron, who recently described Islam as “a religion in crisis” and vowed to pass legislation in the coming weeks to allow for greater government control over mosques and their clerics, continued, as some legal scholars have contended that his statements violated both the French Constitution and international law. Others have noted … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

By Omar Farahat It is common knowledge that substantive Islamic laws are constituted of juristic pronouncements (aḥkām) on a wide range of actions, abstentions, and their possible consequences. Internally, we might say, these pronouncements of the jurists assume a sense of authority given their relation to divine revelation. The pronouncements or rulings of the jurists … Continue reading A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Michael Goodyear's (University of Michigan Law School) "Heaven or Earth: The Hagia Sophia Re-Conversion, Turkish and International Law, and Universal Religious Sites" (UCLA Journal of Islamic Law and Near Eastern Law (2021) (forthcoming)) takes a closer look at the recent Turkish court decision that enabled the reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. While … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Register for the 2021 Association of American Law Schools Annual Meeting: The Power of Words

The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) will be holding its next and virtual annual meeting between January 5-9, 2021. For 2021's annual meeting, the AALS decided to offer participating schools a registration rate that allows faculty members and administrators to attend any of the meeting's sessions, which means that scholars from fee-paid AALS member … Continue reading Register for the 2021 Association of American Law Schools Annual Meeting: The Power of Words

Prisons, Abolition and Islamic Legal Discourse

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the fourth and last in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. Over the past several years, there has been a surge of interest in anti-carceral ideas in the United States arising out of greater public awareness of systemic problems in its criminal system. This … Continue reading Prisons, Abolition and Islamic Legal Discourse

Intisar Rabb on Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

The 43rd annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture organized by Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law hosted our Editor-in-Chief, Intisar Rabb, with her presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law." The presentation concerned the Mamlūk Empire during the thirteenth century, with a focus on the judicial overhaul overseen by its Sultan Baibars I. In her presentation, … Continue reading Intisar Rabb on Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law