The Need for an Islamic Bankruptcy Code

Student editor Esther Agbaje (HLS ’17) suggests that sukuk (commonly called Islamic bonds) are insufficient to handle bankruptcy in financial systems operating with respect to Islamic law, or sharīʿa compliance. Banks and other financial institutions or municipalities that issue sukuk intend for these instrument to organize debt and therefore to be insulated from default. This idea seeks to implement the Islamic law financial principle of profit/loss sharing, designed to … Continue reading The Need for an Islamic Bankruptcy Code

STANDARDS:: Auditing and Accounting Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions’ (AAOIFI) Sharīʿa Standards for Financial Institutions (2010)

In 2007, the Auditing and Accounting Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) considered about 85% of sukuk (commonly called Islamic bonds) to be non-sharīʿa-compliant. In 2010 they released these comprehensive guidelines on Islamic finance, including a section on sukuk (pg. 303), which outlines factors to consider when creating Islamic bonds. One such factor is industry, … Continue reading STANDARDS:: Auditing and Accounting Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions’ (AAOIFI) Sharīʿa Standards for Financial Institutions (2010)