Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Allan Goodson, a mechanic in southern Utah, alleged that he was harassed by his employer and fired from his job because he converted to Islam. News outlets in the Arab world, particularly in Egypt, the UAE, and Saudi Arabia, have portrayed the recent dismissal of the prime minister and closure of parliament by the Tunisian … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

As talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban continue, the US peace envoy to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalizad's proposal circulated to both parties includes "a High Council for Islamic Jurisprudence," to advise ordinary courts as to matters involving the interpretation of Islamic law. Austrian Muslims have planned to sue the Austrian government under the leadership … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

By Kristina L. Richardson For centuries the Sunnī Mālikī madhhab has predominated among Muslims of northern and western Africa, but before the 12th century, Shīʿī, Khārijī, and Ibāḍī legal schools vied for dominance.[1] Merchants living under the Ibāḍī Rustamids (779-909, capital in Tāhart) and in independent Khārijī states in the western Maghrib, such as the … Continue reading Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

Field Guide to Islamic Law Online

Image of yellow text with red background, which reads "A Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources"

The Field Guide to Islamic Law Online, in the form of a Google document, is a collection of resource links and annotations to SHARIAsource and other Harvard resources, global online digital resources, and a robust “Digital Islamic Law Collection.” We recently added exciting resources to this list: Riyadh Mosque Archive in Lamu, Kenya: "This project … Continue reading Field Guide to Islamic Law Online

“700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University”

The following article was cross-posted from Liberty Writers Africa. "700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University" Not until recently did most commentators on African literary history believe that African societies had any form of writing tradition. Since the rediscovery of ancient manuscript collections, with some dating back to at least the 8th century … Continue reading “700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University”