Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Allan Goodson, a mechanic in southern Utah, alleged that he was harassed by his employer and fired from his job because he converted to Islam. News outlets in the Arab world, particularly in Egypt, the UAE, and Saudi Arabia, have portrayed the recent dismissal of the prime minister and closure of parliament by the Tunisian … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Religious freedom in post-revolution Tunisia

By Nadia Marzouki* Summary Tunisia has often been too quickly branded as the poster child of the Arab Spring, without consideration of the real challenges and uncertainties faced by this fragile democracy. However, the creation of its 2014 constitution offers a crucial lesson in governmental protection of religious freedom, especially in a state with a … Continue reading Religious freedom in post-revolution Tunisia

Scholarship in “Plain English”: Intisar Rabb on Islamic Constitutionalism after the Arab Spring

By Nadia Sayed and Helena Swanson-Nystrom Citation: Nadia Sayed & Helena Swanson-Nystrom, Review of Intisar A. Rabb, The Least Religious Branch? The New Islamic Constitutionalism after the Arab Spring [17 UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs 75 (2013)], Islamic Law Blog (Mar. 2017) Summary Following the uprisings that began in 2010 known as … Continue reading Scholarship in “Plain English”: Intisar Rabb on Islamic Constitutionalism after the Arab Spring

Blasphemy law in Egypt: the intersection of sharÄ«’a and state control over public morals

By Jiou Park Since the debacle surrounding the film, The Innocence of Muslims, which triggered prosecution and websites blocks across various Muslim-majority countries, blasphemy law in Muslim majority countries has been a familiar topic for many in the West.[1] As a result, a common perception is that blasphemy law, which aims to regulate or criminalize … Continue reading Blasphemy law in Egypt: the intersection of sharÄ«’a and state control over public morals