Islamic Law in the News Roundup

As talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban continue, the US peace envoy to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalizad's proposal circulated to both parties includes "a High Council for Islamic Jurisprudence," to advise ordinary courts as to matters involving the interpretation of Islamic law. Austrian Muslims have planned to sue the Austrian government under the leadership … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls, accusing the competing ḥalāl restaurant of trademark infringement. Four alleged white supremacists who are accused of anti-Muslim violence, among other charges, can face charges based on the Anti-Riot Act of 1968, a federal appeals court ruled. Iran's Expediency Council, tasked with settling disagreements between the parliament … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

By Intisar Rabb This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in a short post, also by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Introduction* We’ve all … Continue reading Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

Sharī‘a and Surrogacy in Pakistan

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Source Summary: In Farooq Siddiqui v. Mst. Farzana Naheed,[1] the Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan (“the Court”)[2] considers whether surrogacy can be reconciled with … Continue reading Sharī‘a and Surrogacy in Pakistan

Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Summary In 1988, the Supreme Court of Malaysia heard the case of Che Omar bin Che Soh v. Public Prosecutor.1 The case arose as … Continue reading Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19

By Mona Oraby This essay is the final of three essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is “Islamic law and the liberal arts” and the second is “Why we should start with women.” Amherst College, where I teach, announced on 9 March 2020 that it would move to remote … Continue reading Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19

Why we should start with women

By Mona Oraby This is the second of two essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is "Islamic law and the liberal arts." The open curriculum at Amherst means that I mostly teach a captive audience. There are no gen-ed requirements to drive enrollment. Students who show up for my … Continue reading Why we should start with women

A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: In November 2009, Switzerland passed a popular initiative prohibiting the construction of minarets. In response, Mr. Ouardiri, a Muslim living in Switzerland, challenged … Continue reading A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

By Mona Oraby This essay is the first of three essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The second is “Why we should start with women” and the third is “Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19.” I teach a course called Islamic Constitutionalism at Amherst College. Colleagues at other institutions are often surprised and flattered when … Continue reading Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: Khursheed Ahmad Khan v. State of U.P. is a recent Indian Supreme Court case. Khursheed Ahmad Khan (appellant), a Muslim civil servant, married … Continue reading The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law