Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Innovation, Influence, and Borrowing in Mamluk-Era Legal Maxim Collections: The Case of Ibn ʿAbd al-Salām and al-Qarāfī" (Journal of the American Oriental Society 140, no. 4 (October-December 2020)), Mariam Sheibani (University of Toronto Scarborough; Lead Blog Editor) shows that the renowned Mālikī jurist al-Qarāfī's contribution to Islamic legal thought was, in part, based on … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Malaysia’s Minister of Religious Affairs, Datuk Seri Dr Zulkifli Mohamad Al-Bakri, stated that the country’s National Fatwā Council would study the vaccine and its permissibility at length at a conference with state muftīs, scholars, and health experts. Deputy Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation of Malaysia, Ahmad Amzad Hashim, announced that about 30% of Malaysians … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Details of France’s proposed bill to counter what President Macron called “Islamic separatism” began to emerge: the bill seeks to criminalize disclosing data about a person’s location to those who might do harm, to provide for summary trials for perpetrators of online hate crimes, to empower judges to prevent individuals with a certain criminal history … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The 43rd Annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture speaker Intisar Rabb's (Harvard) presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law" explains the judicial overhaul that occurred during the thirteenth century under the reign of Baibars I, Mamlūk sultan of Egypt and Syria, who established four chief judgeships representing each of the four major (Sunnī) schools of Islamic law … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. Bahrain's Ayatollah Sheikh Isa Qassim calls for the suspension of religious and social activities throughout the country. Iran cancels … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Recent Scholarship: Gómez-Rivas on the Development of Legal Institutions in the Far Maghrib

Law and the Islamization of Morocco under the Almoravids: The Fatwās of Ibn Rushd al-Jadd by Camilo Gómez-Rivas. From the publisher: "Law and the Islamization of Morocco under the Almoravids. The Fatwās of Ibn Rushd al-Jadd to the Far Maghrib investigates the development of legal institutions in the Far Maghrib during its unification with al-Andalus under the … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Gómez-Rivas on the Development of Legal Institutions in the Far Maghrib

In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt

Last month, Equal Times (a Brussels-based news site) published an article discussing the increase in paternity lawsuits and calls for DNA testing in Egypt. The Egyptian government estimates there are 75,000 paternity cases that are slowly making their way through the family court system. According to the article, the judges in these paternity cases have … Continue reading In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt

Commentary :: DNA Tests in Morocco: Marking a Historic Turn in Islamic Law

By Zaynab El Bernoussi Last year, the Tangiers First Instance Family Court allowed for DNA tests to be admitted into evidence in family law cases. The plaintiff was a mother who wanted to prove the paternity (bunuwwa) and lineage (nasab) of her daughter born out of wedlock. The case illustrates how, as medical science advances, … Continue reading Commentary :: DNA Tests in Morocco: Marking a Historic Turn in Islamic Law

Circulaire Bank al-Maghrib

This is a memorandum (circulaire) issued by the shari'a board of the Central Bank of Morocco (Bank al-Maghrib) in January 2017. The document contains fatwās pertaining to Islamic financial instruments such as murābaḥa and regulations concerning its practice and penalties. See document and see the interview with a sharīʿa auditor at Dar Assafaa.