Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The Ottoman History Podcast's series on "The Making of the Islamic World" is now available online in its entirety. The project is a ten-part series consisting of interviews with a diverse group of scholars on a number of scholarly issues, ranging from the question of "What is Islamic Law?" to "The Early Modern Islamic World." … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The Neglected History of Furūʿ and the Premodern/Modern Binary

By Marion Katz (New York University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading The Neglected History of Furūʿ and the Premodern/Modern Binary

A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

By Hiroyuki Yanagihashi (The University of Tokyo) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

By Metin M. Coşgel (University of Connecticut) & Boğaç A. Ergene (University of Vermont) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar … Continue reading Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

By Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University in Qatar) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Four Historical Strategies for Approaching Early Islamic Law

By Elizabeth Urban (West Chester University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Four Historical Strategies for Approaching Early Islamic Law

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Legal Maxims in Islamic Law: Concept, History and Application of Axioms of Juristic Accumulation (Leiden: Brill, 2021) (forthcoming), Necmettin Kizilkaya (Istanbul University) addresses the formation of Islamic law maxims "from a conceptual, historical, and implementational perspective." Rather than focusing on descriptions of maxims, Kizilkaya investigates the context and reasons behind their emergence.

Writing Islamic Legal History

By Rula J. Abisaab (McGill University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Scholars … Continue reading Writing Islamic Legal History

Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

By Najam Haider (Barnard College) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I should … Continue reading Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law