Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "The Application of Maqasid Al-Shari’ah in the Foreign Policy of Islamic States" (International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 2021), Usman Safiyanu Duguri and others discuss the relevance of the objectives of Islamic law (maqāsid al-sharī'a) to how Muslim-majority nations formulate their foreign policies, with an added observation that maqāsid al-sharī'a … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

:: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: Introduction

Mohammad Fadel (Professor of Law, University of Toronto) and Connell Monette (Vice President of Academic Affairs, American Academy Casablanca) organized a PIL Forum Roundtable on the recent publication of al-Muwaṭṭaʾ – Recension of Yahya b. Yahya al-Laythī (d. 234/848) by Mālik b. Anas, distributed through Harvard University Press. This translation is based on the recently … Continue reading :: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: Introduction

:: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: The Handmaiden’s Tale

By Kecia Ali (Boston University) As someone who researches and teaches about early Islamic law, I have longed for a translation of the Muwaṭṭaʾ which renders legal terminology with consistency and precision, suitable for skimming, quoting, recommending to interested lay readers, and assigning to students. There have been two “nonacademic” English translations, primarily aimed at “pious … Continue reading :: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: The Handmaiden’s Tale

:: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: The Virtues of Translation

By Jocelyn Hendrickson (The University of Alberta) As scholars of Islamic legal history, one of the most enjoyable questions we ask ourselves from time to time is, “Should I acquire that shiny new edition?” In our book-intensive discipline, “new” texts that were previously available only in manuscript routinely appear on the shelves of our favorite Arabic … Continue reading :: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: The Virtues of Translation

:: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: Who Are We Writing for When We Translate Classical Texts?

By Marion Katz (New York University)  Perhaps more than any other genre of academic writing, translations of primary sources raise questions about audience and purpose. In a Venn diagram of potential audiences for our scholarly output, our fellow subject specialists would usually occupy (for better or worse) the central position. It is true that in … Continue reading :: Muwaṭṭaʾ Roundtable :: Who Are We Writing for When We Translate Classical Texts?