Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Sovereignty, Territoriality and Islamic Private International Law" (SSRN, October 12, 2021), Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto) argues that "Islamic international law, in its classical phase (8th – 13th centuries), as first formulated by Iraqi, and later, Central Asian, scholars (who later came to be known as Ḥanafīs), understood all … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Navigating Colonial Law in a 'Sea of Islands'" (Law & Social Inquiry Online (December 3, 2021)), Renisa Mawani (University of British Columbia) reviews Nurfadzilah Yahaya's Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Laws and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). In "Rumi without Islam: the cultural appropriation of Rumi" (Bayt Al … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Two phenomena struck me as particularly incongruous while researching for my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast and plagued me throughout the process of writing it. The first was “illegal occupations” (‘onwettige occupaties’) which referred to land occupied by populations who were not allowed to own the land according … Continue reading What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya In my book, Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020), I demonstrate how colonialism embodies a contradiction; in a sense, colonial authorities limited and restricted subjects’ lives, but their authority gave rise to a sense of possibility for some colonial subjects perceived to be elite.[1] The largest … Continue reading Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary