Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

By Mehdi Berriah This is part one in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. While the spirit and laws of jihād have often attracted the attention of researchers, this is not the case for its economic aspect, which remains poorly known. It must be kept in mind … Continue reading The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change” by Dr. Samy Ayoub

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Dr. Samy Ayoub entitled “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change,” delivered on May 26, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Samy Ayoub’s lecture on May 26, 2021 on late Ḥanafī rasā’il … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change” by Dr. Samy Ayoub

Islamic Law of Paternity and DNA Evidence

By Ayman Shabana In the Islamic tradition, Islamic rules governing paternity are closely tied to a number of important legal concepts and procedures. Most importantly, paternity regulations have strong connections with marriage and the definition of a licit sexual relationship, mainly in light of the well-known Prophetic report which has established that link “the child … Continue reading Islamic Law of Paternity and DNA Evidence

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Peace to those of Faith: Political Affiliation and Belonging in Classical Islamic Thought" (Routledge Handbook of Citizenship in the Middle East and North Africa 2021), Omar Farahat (McGill University Faculty of Law) discusses the concept of belonging in classical Islamic thought, focusing on multilayered descriptions of tribal identity. In "Eradicating Gender-Based Violence against Female-Intimate … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A California Court of Appeals refused to apply Iranian law in a case involving a plaintiff whose work in Iran exposed him to high levels of asbestos, reasoning that Iranian law reflects religious ideology instead of economic interest. The All India Muslim Personal Law Board issued a statement urging Muslims in India to adhere to Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Mohammad Fadel

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Prof. Mohammad Fadel entitled "Form, Function and Historical Development of Mukthasars in Post-Mamluk Islamic Law," delivered on February 24, 2021 at 11am (EST), 5pm (Münster) 7pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor Fadel’s lecture described the history, purpose, and nature of late medieval Mālikī mukhtaṣars. … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Mohammad Fadel

Writing Islamic Legal History

By Rula J. Abisaab (McGill University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Scholars … Continue reading Writing Islamic Legal History

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence

By Omar Farahat A question that classical Muslim jurisprudents debated vigorously was: how do we undertake our duties when divine commands only give general guidelines in relation to time, or no time-specific determinations at all? At the heart of this question is how divine speech, mediated by the work of jurisprudents, should be seen to … Continue reading Time and Moral Choice in Islamic Jurisprudence