Why we should start with women

By Mona Oraby This is the second of two essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is "Islamic law and the liberal arts." The open curriculum at Amherst means that I mostly teach a captive audience. There are no gen-ed requirements to drive enrollment. Students who show up for my … Continue reading Why we should start with women

Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

By Mona Oraby I teach a course called Islamic Constitutionalism at Amherst College. Colleagues at other institutions are often surprised and flattered when I tell them I use their casebooks, International Journal of Constitutional Law articles, and monographs in my teaching. Flattered because, well, it’s always flattering to hear that what we write is read … Continue reading Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. Bahrain's Ayatollah Sheikh Isa Qassim calls for the suspension of religious and social activities throughout the country. Iran cancels … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

In this final post reflecting on my primary source seminar “Readings in Islamic law,” I want to highlight three further topics covered in the course. The first of these is the genre of comparative law (khilāf), for which we read writings by Ibn al-Mundhir from the early fourth/tenth century, al-Kadamī from the fourth/tenth century, and … Continue reading Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach

After the first session of my Islamic law seminar this fall, I chose the readings for each class with an eye on the particular interests of the enrolled students. Accordingly, of the three fatwas we read, spanning the fourteenth and twentieth centuries, the first reflected one student’s interest in medical ethics. The fatwa in question … Continue reading Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach

Different genres, different approaches

For the first session of my graduate seminar “Readings in Islamic Law” this fall, I asked students to read two texts: a hadith on divorce initiated by the wife (al-Bukhārī, Kitāb al-Khulʿ, story of the wife of Thābit b. Qays) and a legal debate between Abū Isḥāq al-Shīrāzī and al-Dāmaghānī in the eleventh century (from … Continue reading Different genres, different approaches

Teaching Islamic law through primary sources

In the fall quarter of 2019, I am teaching a graduate seminar titled “Readings in Islamic Law” at the University of Chicago. In this blog post and the three that follow I will describe the theoretical and practical considerations that have influenced the design of the course and talk about some of the readings I … Continue reading Teaching Islamic law through primary sources

Law and Economic Life in the Islamic World: A Teaching Post

By Fahad Ahmad Bishara. Reposted from the Legal History Blog with permission from the author. For this post, instead of giving reflections on research or on writing in Indian Ocean legal history, I thought I’d write about something lots of us do and talk about: teaching. It is, after all, that time in the semester, isn’t it? … Continue reading Law and Economic Life in the Islamic World: A Teaching Post

Opportunity: Practitioner Chair (Part Time), Queen’s University Belfast

This post is available immediately for 5 years on 0.4fte basis, to provide leadership in the development, management and delivery of Institute engagement with non-academic practitioners working in the field of peace, security and justice in the Muslim World and to sustain a personal research plan, including research grant application. Further information about the Institute … Continue reading Opportunity: Practitioner Chair (Part Time), Queen’s University Belfast

Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Islamic World History, Lehigh University

The Department of History and the Center for Global Islamic Studies at Lehigh University welcome applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor with expertise in a particular region of the Islamic World combined with broad training in the history of Islam’s transnational, cross-cultural, and global dimensions. This position carries a 2/2 teaching load of graduate (M.A. … Continue reading Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Islamic World History, Lehigh University