Scholarship as Resistance: An Interview with Wael Hallaq

This interview was conducted by Omar Abdel-Ghaffar (Harvard University, PhD student). This interview is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction.” Islamic Law Blog … Continue reading Scholarship as Resistance: An Interview with Wael Hallaq

Why we should start with women

By Mona Oraby This is the second of two essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is "Islamic law and the liberal arts." The open curriculum at Amherst means that I mostly teach a captive audience. There are no gen-ed requirements to drive enrollment. Students who show up for my … Continue reading Why we should start with women

A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt

By Christopher Rose At Cairo, sanitary matters are nearly at a standstill; the executive administration cannot enforce their orders. On Saturday last, the bad feeling … nearly stirred up a rebellion, so that matters looked very serious. The Egyptian lower classes consider all precautions to be impious; “God is Great,” they cry, and all is … Continue reading A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt

Contemporary Primary Sources: Response of New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board to Lux Body Wash Ad (1996)

A complaint to the New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board about an arguably Orientalist depiction of a Western woman in an Islamic country for a Lux Body Wash ad. The ruling is of interest for its discussion about the depiction of religion and community standards in New Zealand (at the time) and the level of … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Response of New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board to Lux Body Wash Ad (1996)