::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Territory and Jurisdiction” by Adnan A. Zulfiqar

By Adnan A. Zulfiqar This post is part of the Roundtable on the History of Islamic International Law.  It is a summary of Adnan A. Zulfiqar's contribution titled "Territory and Jurisdiction" to volume eight of the Cambridge History of International Law series, co-edited by Intisar Rabb and Umut Özsu. This essay explores features of territory … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Territory and Jurisdiction” by Adnan A. Zulfiqar

::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “War and Peace in the Medieval Islamic World, 622–1453” by Suleiman A. Mourad

By Suleiman Mourad This post is part of the Roundtable on the History of Islamic International Law.  It is a summary of Suleiman Mourad's contribution titled "War and Peace in the Medieval Islamic World, 622–1453" to volume eight of the Cambridge History of International Law series, co-edited by Intisar Rabb and Umut Özsu. The study … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “War and Peace in the Medieval Islamic World, 622–1453” by Suleiman A. Mourad

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Why taking action on climate change is an Islamic obligation" (Wisconsin Muslim Journal, November 16, 2021), editors of the Wisconsin Muslim Journal argue that "the possibility of environmental protection can also be covered by the Islamic concept of jihad, especially for individual Muslims and Muslim organizations." In "Al-Shāfiʿī Against the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "The Hoax in the ISIS Flag" (Newlinesmag.org, October 28, 2021), Ahmed El Shamsy (Chicago University) explains how a forged letter, presented by a French diplomat in the middle of the 19th century as the genuine writing of the Prophet, ended up finding its way on the ISIS flag - … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Islam through Objects" (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021), Anna Bigelow (ed.) (Stanford University) curates a collection of essays on objects in Islam and how these objects, including, for example, prayer beads, rugs, amulets, clothing, shed light on what the author terms "Islamic material culture studies." In "Violence in Early Islam: Religious … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Thank you, Mehdi Berriah!

Thank you, Mehdi Berriah, for joining us as guest blog editor in September. In case you missed Prof. Berriah's essays on the financing of jihād in the Mamlūk era, here they are: The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic … Continue reading Thank you, Mehdi Berriah!

A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

By Mehdi Berriah This is part four in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. As noted by Ibrāhīm b. ʿAlī al-Hanafī al-Ṭarsūsī, the possibility of resorting to the imposition of new taxes or the requisition, on the order of the sultan, of goods to finance a war effort … Continue reading A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law

The United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan, and the Taliban's subsequent takeover of the country has brought, once again, Islam and Islamic law to the fore in recent news coverage, reports, and analyses. This renewed attention to Islamic law is in part due to the fact that the Taliban identifies itself as a Muslim military organization … Continue reading Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law

Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

By Mehdi Berriah This is part one in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. While the spirit and laws of jihād have often attracted the attention of researchers, this is not the case for its economic aspect, which remains poorly known. It must be kept in mind … Continue reading The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period