Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

By Kristina L. Richardson Allow me to share a factoid about Toni Morrison’s (1931-2019) little known connection to Islamic historians. She grew up in Lorain, Ohio, with her younger cousin John Ralph Willis (1938-2007), who carried the name of their grandfather, a violinist named John Solomon Willis. The cousins forged separate paths as adults, only … Continue reading Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

Islam and Data Science Roundup

In "Semantic Mapping of An Ottoman Fetva Compilation: EBUSSUUD Efendi’s Jurisprudence through a Computational Lens" (Journal of Islamic Legal Studies 32, no. 1 (2021)), Bogac Ergene (University of Vermont) and Atabey Kaygun (Istanbul Technical University) "propose[] computational methodologies that could characterize the contents of a 6,000-fetva corpus by an important Ottoman jurist, Şeyhülislam Ebussuud Efendi … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

By Metin M. Coşgel (University of Connecticut) & Boğaç A. Ergene (University of Vermont) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar … Continue reading Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Through the writings of eminent classic and contemporary Islamic jurists, Ayesha Shahid explores the development of As-Siyar (Islamic international law) within the Islamic legal tradition in "An Exploration of the ‘Global’ History of International Law: Some Perspectives from within the Islamic Legal Traditions," International Law and Islam. The author attempts to address the existing gaps in the global history of the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Maryam Saeed discusses the constraints in Islamic insurance (takāful) and its impact on the performance of takāful operators in "Challenges of Islamic Insurance (Takaful) Globally," COMSATS Journal of Islamic Finance, 2019. (This article was also featured in this week's issue of SSRN’s Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal). In "Islamic Financial Intermediation of Indonesian Economic … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: August 23

SSRN's logo featuring the letters "S" "S" "R" "N" in capital letters

This week’s issue of SSRN’s Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal includes: "Economic Harbingers of Political Modernization: Peaceful Explosion of Rights in Ottoman Istanbul" by Asli Cansunar and Timur Kuran This paper ascribes a fundamental role to prior shifts in wealth toward non-Muslims and away from conservative groups, including Muslim clerics. These shifts, all under way in … Continue reading Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: August 23

Recent Scholarship: Coşgel and Ergene on Ottoman Justice

The Economics of Ottoman Justice: Settlement and Trial in the Sharia Courts by Metin Coşgel, University of Connecticut and Boğaç Ergene, University of Vermont published. From the publisher: "During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Ottoman Empire endured long periods of warfare, facing intense financial pressures and new international mercantile and monetary trends. The Empire also experienced major political-administrative restructuring and socioeconomic transformations. … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Coşgel and Ergene on Ottoman Justice