Conference: Fostering Ethics – Islam, Adoption and the Care of Children (25 June, Virtual Conference – University of Cambridge)

The Centre of Islamic Studies and CRASSH at the University of Cambridge are hosting a joint virtual conference on the 25th of June. This event will explore the challenges and possibilities for a new ethics of care for orphaned or abandoned children in Muslim communities. The adoption or fostering of children represents a complex issue … Continue reading Conference: Fostering Ethics – Islam, Adoption and the Care of Children (25 June, Virtual Conference – University of Cambridge)

:: Pandemic Roundtable :: Introduction

In the age of COVID-2019, we at the Islamic Law Blog have curated a set of essays on the theme of pandemics in Islamic history and thought. Leading scholars and advanced students of Islamic law and history comment on the phenomena of plagues and epidemics across centuries and geographic boundaries, giving us an opportunity to … Continue reading :: Pandemic Roundtable :: Introduction

Against “flattening the [curve of] diversity of approaches” to Muslim understandings of contagion in a time of pandemic :: Part Two

By Justin Stearns Part Two: Diversity and Change in Scholarly Approaches to the Plague Jurists’ ongoing engagement with how to respond to epidemics speak to the vibrancy of this ongoing discussion, even as a quick comparison with chronicles shows that the juridical discussion did not map cleanly onto social responses. In the late fifteenth century, … Continue reading Against “flattening the [curve of] diversity of approaches” to Muslim understandings of contagion in a time of pandemic :: Part Two

Against “flattening the [curve of] diversity of approaches” to Muslim understandings of contagion in a time of pandemic :: Part One

By Justin Stearns Part One: Sources and Approaches The global spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 during the first months of 2020 exposed Muslims to a contagious pandemic on a scale unknown in living memory, prompting unprecedented public health measures in Muslim majority countries, and leading many Muslims to reflect on the ways in which past … Continue reading Against “flattening the [curve of] diversity of approaches” to Muslim understandings of contagion in a time of pandemic :: Part One

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. All roundups can be found at this link. Religious communities use digital tools, such as Zoom, to host services, lead … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Law in Action, in the Peripheral Vision of the Sources

In my last post I referenced Jack Tannous’s metaphor of “dark matter,” which draws our attention to the scattered traces of the vast majority of premodern Muslims who have left us few direct records of their opinions. In this post I’d like to suggest another metaphor, “peripheral vision.” We can think of the disciplines and … Continue reading Law in Action, in the Peripheral Vision of the Sources

Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Financial Ethics

Mohammad Fadel, Professor of Law at the University of Toronto, wrote a chapter in Islam and Applied Ethics (Hamad bin Khalifa University Press, 2017) exploring the ethical principles that inform Islamic law in connection with finance: “Ethics and Finance: An Islamic Perspective in the Light of the Purposes of Islamic Sharia” The chapter was originally … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Financial Ethics

Professor Khaled Abou El Fadl on “Islamic Law in an Age of Fear”

On October 1st, 2018, Professor Khaled Abou El Fadl spoke to a gathering of around 40 students and scholars at Harvard Law School for a SHARIAsource lunch talk entitled "Islamic Law in an Age of Fear." He discussed themes from his new book, focusing on the widening epistemological gaps between historical practice and modern consciousness. … Continue reading Professor Khaled Abou El Fadl on “Islamic Law in an Age of Fear”