Judicial Bureaucracy: Revisiting Modern Theory for the Study of Islamic Law

By Nahed Samour Surely, Max Weber was wrong with his assumptions about Kadi-Justice (kadijustiz).[1] He is rightly criticized as a modernization theorist, placing a protestant work ethics at the centre of progress in the modern West, which was picked up to explain a “global envy” of the West and an obsession to imitate it, encouraging … Continue reading Judicial Bureaucracy: Revisiting Modern Theory for the Study of Islamic Law

Ways for Muslims to Follow Islamic Law amid the Spanish Inquisition

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Background In the year 711, Muslim forces invaded the Iberian Peninsula and conquered most of its defenders within a decade. The Muslim Andalusian Umayyad … Continue reading Ways for Muslims to Follow Islamic Law amid the Spanish Inquisition

The case of the free woman who was enslaved

Umayyad Cordoba Years 300/912-309/921 and 312/924-314/926, when Aslam b. ʽAbd al-ʽAzīz was the judge in Cordoba. The source is literary (biographical dictionary of Cordoban judges) and based on oral information. A non Arab who was a former rebel lord had submitted to ʽAbd al-Raḥmān III and now lived in Cordoba. He had in his possession … Continue reading The case of the free woman who was enslaved