COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

The muftī of Pahang (Malaysia) stated that he hopes the Covid-19 vaccines currently being worked on are ḥalāl, that is, permissible under Islamic law. The Wall Street Journal reported that the coronavirus and the related drop in oil prices have forced Gulf countries to adopt more Western norms in an attempt to attract foreign talent and … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Vice President Maruf Amin of Indonesia confirmed President Joko Widodo’s view that COVID-19 vaccines should receive a ḥalāl certification to render their use permissible under Islamic law. Harvard University's Center for African Studies will host an online lecture on November 12, 2020, titled "Legal Regulation of Faith: The Limits of Religious Freedom and the Challenge … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Summary In 1988, the Supreme Court of Malaysia heard the case of Che Omar bin Che Soh v. Public Prosecutor.1 The case arose as … Continue reading Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

  Damilola S. Olawuyi, Associate Professor at the College of Law  at Hamad Bin Khalifa University,  explores Islamic alternative dispute resolution methods: can they provide an alternative legal framework for resolving non-commercial disputes such as those that arise in family disputes, property, and inheritance? Friday, a Court  in Abuja, Nigeria dissolved a 32-year-old marriage on … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup