Terminological Tensions

By Guy Burak [Muḥammad al-Timurtāshī] said in Minaḥ al-Ghaffār: “the sijill is the document (ḥujja) where the verdict (ḥukm) of the judge [is written].” But this is in their custom (ʿurfihim, i.e. al-Timurtāshī and his circle). In our custom (ʿurfinā, presumably the custom endorsed by the Ottoman learned hierarchy and affiliates), it is a large … Continue reading Terminological Tensions

Narrating Change

By Guy Burak The increasingly systematic study of Ottoman Islam – or, perhaps, Islam in the Ottoman Empire – is arguably one of the greatest historiographical developments in Islamic studies in recent decades. Indeed, the examination of the relationship between the Ottoman dynasty and multiple Islamic traditions has radically transformed the understanding of the “middle … Continue reading Narrating Change

When Worship Meets Taxation: Socio-Political Reflections on the Rules of Zakat

By Sohail Hanif We continue our reflection on social dimensions of Islamic law by turning our attention to the rules of Zakat,[1] the obligatory alms in Islam. Zakat is a social institution, as it represents wealth moving from the ‘rich’ to the ‘poor’. By its very nature, Zakat creates social ties and dependencies. From the … Continue reading When Worship Meets Taxation: Socio-Political Reflections on the Rules of Zakat

A Prayer-Based Civilizational Order: The Social Dimension of the Rules of Ritual Prayer

By Sohail Hanif Ritual prayer (ṣalāh) is a pillar of Islam. It functions as a pillar that upholds the daily routine and spiritual journey of a believer. However, the spiritual dimension of prayer is not a topic of investigation in works of Islamic law. There is, on the other hand, another overarching interest of Muslim … Continue reading A Prayer-Based Civilizational Order: The Social Dimension of the Rules of Ritual Prayer

Social Dependencies of Islamic Law: A View Through the Legal Commentary

By Sohail Hanif My research has centred on unpacking layers of argumentation in works of Islamic law, particularly legal commentaries. As one unpacks these layers, one comes to learn that what actually is ‘law’ is not always clear, and that it is within the arguments that one finds the principles and reasoning for the sake … Continue reading Social Dependencies of Islamic Law: A View Through the Legal Commentary

Thank you, Issam Eido!

Thank you, Issam Eido, for joining us as guest blog editor in November. In case you missed Prof. Eido's essays on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law, here they are: Lived or Non-Lived Ḥadīth? Content vs. Narrator Criteria in Early Ḥanafī Law Early Ḥanafī Jurists, Court Practice, and … Continue reading Thank you, Issam Eido!

Tools for Interpreting Ḥadīth in Shaybānī’s Ḥujja

By Issam Eido This is part four in a series of four posts on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law. Kitāb al-Ḥujja ʿalā Ahl al-Madīna is one of several books attributed to the judge Muḥammad ibn al-Ḥasan al-Shaybānī.[1] Early Ḥanafī biographical dictionaries used to classify early Ḥanafī … Continue reading Tools for Interpreting Ḥadīth in Shaybānī’s Ḥujja

Canons: Specific and General aṣl

By Issam Eido This is part three in a series of four posts on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law. Before the emergence of the canonical ḥadīth books, courts served as one of the main factors in the formative period in impacting the concept of fiqh and … Continue reading Canons: Specific and General aṣl

Lived or Non-Lived Ḥadīth? Content vs. Narrator Criteria in Early Ḥanafī Law

By Issam Eido This is part one in a series of four posts on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law. In this series of four essays, I examine briefly the interpretive standards that were followed by early Ḥanafīs for analyzing, verifying, or rejecting ḥadīth. The first essay discusses the significance … Continue reading Lived or Non-Lived Ḥadīth? Content vs. Narrator Criteria in Early Ḥanafī Law

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change” by Dr. Samy Ayoub

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Dr. Samy Ayoub entitled “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change,” delivered on May 26, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom.  The video recording of the lecture can be accessed here. Samy … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Creativity in Continuity: al-rasā’il al-fiqhīyya as a Genre for Legal Change” by Dr. Samy Ayoub