16 Reasons Why: Forgery and the Household of the Prophet

By Rami Koujah This post is part of a series of posts on the latest publication in our Harvard Series in Islamic Law, Hossein Modarressi’s Text and Interpretation: Imam JaÊ¿far al-Ṣādiq and His Legacy in Islamic Law. This series of posts take a deeper dive into the book, which examines the main characteristics of the … Continue reading 16 Reasons Why: Forgery and the Household of the Prophet

A Prayer-Based Civilizational Order: The Social Dimension of the Rules of Ritual Prayer

By Sohail Hanif Ritual prayer (á¹£alāh) is a pillar of Islam. It functions as a pillar that upholds the daily routine and spiritual journey of a believer. However, the spiritual dimension of prayer is not a topic of investigation in works of Islamic law. There is, on the other hand, another overarching interest of Muslim … Continue reading A Prayer-Based Civilizational Order: The Social Dimension of the Rules of Ritual Prayer

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS The new leader of Indonesia’s largest Muslim organization, Nahdlatul Ulama's new chairman Yahya Cholil Staquf, expressed his willingness to fight extremism by focusing on traditional Islamic legal doctrine, particularly on the issue of apostasy.  Recent surveys have suggested that roughly one out of five Muslims is in an interfaith marriage, … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Muslim cryptocurrency enthusiasts in Indonesia have found a way around the recent fatwā issued by the nation's Ulama Council, ruling that cryptocurrency is forbidden under to Islamic law. The Bangladesh House Building Finance Corporation (BHBFC) stated that it has started sharÄ«'a-based financing in the housing sector. The Taliban's implementation of … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Wearing the Niqab: Muslim Women in the UK and the US" (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021), Anna Piela (Northwestern University) argues that niqāb, the Islamic face veil, has become the ubiquitous symbol of "everything that is perceived to be wrong about Islam," and further discusses how discussions surrounding its permissibility and … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister responsible for religious affairs stated that a group of Malaysian imāms who are refusing to receive the coronavirus vaccine will undergo a counseling session that will explain the importance of vaccination. The Iraqi government announced that it will allow up to 40,000 foreigners to participate in the ShÄ«'Ä« pilgrimage to Karbala … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Al-Qarāfī on the Importance of Legal Maxims and Distinctions in Jurisprudence

By Mariam Sheibani Source: Al-QarāfÄ«, Shihāb al-DÄ«n. Kitāb al-furÅ«q aw Anwār al-burÅ«q fī anwāʾ al-furÅ«q. 3rd ed. Edited by Muḥammad Sarrāj and Ê¿AlÄ« JumuÊ¿a. 2 vols. Cairo: Dār al-Salām, 2010. General Description: This analysis discusses Shihāb al-DÄ«n al-Qarāfī’s theory of the purpose of legal maxims and distinctions (qawāʿid and furÅ«q) as presented in his collection of … Continue reading Al-QarāfÄ« on the Importance of Legal Maxims and Distinctions in Jurisprudence

Al-Qarāfī’s collection of legal distinctions

By Mariam Sheibani Source: Al-QarāfÄ«, Shihāb al-DÄ«n. Kitāb al-furÅ«q aw Anwār al-burÅ«q fÄ« anwāʿ al-furÅ«q. 3rd ed. Edited by MuhÌ£ammad Sarrāj and Ê¿AlÄ« JumuÊ¿a. 2 vols. Cairo: Dār al-Salām, 2010. General Description: This excerpt comprises the seventy eighth ‘legal distinction’ in Qarāfī’s collection of legal distinctions (furÅ«q). Legal distinctions are a subset of legal maxims, … Continue reading Al-Qarāfī’s collection of legal distinctions

Authority and Khums in the Absence of the Imām: Reflections of Two Safavid-era Jurists

By Mohammad Sagha This post examines how two á¹¢afavid-era jurists, Ḥussayn b. ʽAbd al-á¹¢amad al-ʽĀmilÄ« (d. 985/1577-8),[1] and Muḥammad Bāqir MajlisÄ« (d. 1111/1698) conceptualized the authority to collect and spend the portion of khums[2]allocated for the Imām’s discretion (sahm al-Imām)[3] during the period of occultation.[4] Shīʽī legal reasoning regarding the allocation of khums is important … Continue reading Authority and Khums in the Absence of the Imām: Reflections of Two Safavid-era Jurists

Judicial Authority and Roots of Twelver Shīʽī Tax Theory

By Mohammad Sagha The main question this study addresses is: how can the delegation of authority within the Shīʽī* community after the Minor Occultation of the Twelfth Imām in 260/874 explain Shīʽī judicial views on religious tax theory?[1] The advent of the Minor Occultation produced an environment of doubt for the followers of the imāms … Continue reading Judicial Authority and Roots of Twelver Shīʽī Tax Theory