In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

Two weeks ago, the European Court of Justice—the EU’s highest court—ruled that meat derived from animals that were not stunned before being slaughtered could not be labeled “organic.” The Court explained that the “organic” label was developed in response to consumers’ demand for food that protected animals’ welfare, and that scientific studies have shown that … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

In the News: “Politicization” of Islamic Law in Europe

Last week, the UK’s Telegraph newspaper published an interview (free registration may be required to read the full article) with Seyran Ates, who in 2017 established a mosque in Germany where men and women pray side by side, and women can lead the prayers. The interview focused on Islamic identity in Europe, and specifically Ates’ … Continue reading In the News: “Politicization” of Islamic Law in Europe

European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law [Molla Sali v. Greece (ECHR 2018)]

In December 2018, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) considered the question whether Muslim citizens who lived in the Greek province of Thrace could be required to submit to the jurisdiction of Islamic law, as detailed by local experts called muftīs. In Greek law, Islamic law usually governed matters of family law—such as marriage, … Continue reading European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law [Molla Sali v. Greece (ECHR 2018)]

In the News: Islamic Veils in France

Two weeks ago, the UN Human Rights Committee (which oversees compliance with the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights) declared that France’s ban on full-face veils violates freedom of religion. According to the 2010 French law, “No one may, in a public space, wear any article of clothing intended to conceal the face.” … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Veils in France

Contemporary Primary Sources: Press Release on Court of Justice of the European Union’s Ruling on Religious and Political Symbols in the Workplace

Two Muslim women who were prohibited by their respective employers from wearing a ḥijāb sued their employers on the grounds of religious discrimination. The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) decided whether these women had been unfairly dismissed by their respective employers when taking into account the 2000 EU directive on discrimination in the workplace. The ECJ ruled that … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Press Release on Court of Justice of the European Union’s Ruling on Religious and Political Symbols in the Workplace