Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Muslim Women Scholars: 10,000 Biographies Capturing 1000 Years of Lost History" (Medium, March 8, 2021), Arzoo Ahmed describes the work of Dr. Mohammad Akram Nadwi that recently culminated in the publication of a 43-volume collection on female ḥadīth transmitters.

A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

By Hiroyuki Yanagihashi (The University of Tokyo) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Summary In 1988, the Supreme Court of Malaysia heard the case of Che Omar bin Che Soh v. Public Prosecutor.1 The case arose as … Continue reading Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

Islamic Law Lexicon :: Ḥadīth

Ḥadīth = “the corpus of traditions from the Prophet”; reports of words and sayings attributed to the Prophet Muḥammad (for Sunnīs) as well as to a series of Imams who succeeded him (for Shīʿa); the text of the second source of Islamic law. Context Muḥammad is undoubtedly one of the central figures in Islamic law and … Continue reading Islamic Law Lexicon :: Ḥadīth