A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

By Hiroyuki Yanagihashi (The University of Tokyo) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Why did legal scholars write the books they wrote in pre-modern Islamic societies? The case of al-Andalus

By Maribel Fierro (Institute of Languages and Cultures of the Mediterranean, CSIC-Madrid) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and … Continue reading Why did legal scholars write the books they wrote in pre-modern Islamic societies? The case of al-Andalus

Commentary :: Gharar: The Origins of the Prohibition

By Katarzyna Sidło Gharar is arguably one of the least understood concepts in Islamic finance. In linguistic terms, it means jeopardy, risk, danger, or hazard, and is a verbal noun (maṣdar) from the word taghr, which in turn means exposing oneself or one’s property to danger. It may refer to ignorance, injustice, or deceit. As … Continue reading Commentary :: Gharar: The Origins of the Prohibition

Islamic Law Lexicon :: Ḥadīth

This entry provides a definition and analysis of the term ḥadīth, drawing on works by SHARIAsource Senior Scholar, Joseph Lowry, Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania.   Ḥadīth = “the corpus of traditions from the Prophet”; reports of words and sayings attributed to the Prophet Muhammad (for Sunnis) as … Continue reading Islamic Law Lexicon :: Ḥadīth