Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Muslim Women Scholars: 10,000 Biographies Capturing 1000 Years of Lost History" (Medium, March 8, 2021), Arzoo Ahmed describes the work of Dr. Mohammad Akram Nadwi that recently culminated in the publication of a 43-volume collection on female ḥadīth transmitters.

Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

By Kristina L. Richardson Allow me to share a factoid about Toni Morrison’s (1931-2019) little known connection to Islamic historians. She grew up in Lorain, Ohio, with her younger cousin John Ralph Willis (1938-2007), who carried the name of their grandfather, a violinist named John Solomon Willis. The cousins forged separate paths as adults, only … Continue reading Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

By Haider A. Hamoudi (University of Pittsburgh) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

Islamic law and the documentary record before 1500: Unsolved problems and untried solutions

By Marina Rustow (Princeton University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Although … Continue reading Islamic law and the documentary record before 1500: Unsolved problems and untried solutions

Simplicity, Creativity, Lucidity as “Method” in the Study of Islamic History: An Interview with Michael Cook

This interview was conducted by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief). This interview is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction.” Intisar Rabb [Rabb]: How … Continue reading Simplicity, Creativity, Lucidity as “Method” in the Study of Islamic History: An Interview with Michael Cook

A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

By Hiroyuki Yanagihashi (The University of Tokyo) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading A Note on the Quantitative Analysis of Hadith

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Why did legal scholars write the books they wrote in pre-modern Islamic societies? The case of al-Andalus

By Maribel Fierro (Institute of Languages and Cultures of the Mediterranean, CSIC-Madrid) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and … Continue reading Why did legal scholars write the books they wrote in pre-modern Islamic societies? The case of al-Andalus

Commentary :: Gharar: The Origins of the Prohibition

By Katarzyna Sidło Gharar is arguably one of the least understood concepts in Islamic finance. In linguistic terms, it means jeopardy, risk, danger, or hazard, and is a verbal noun (maṣdar) from the word taghr, which in turn means exposing oneself or one’s property to danger. It may refer to ignorance, injustice, or deceit. As … Continue reading Commentary :: Gharar: The Origins of the Prohibition