Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS The United States Supreme Court declined to review Hoda Muthana's petition seeking to reenter the United States, after her passport was revoked for leaving the country to join the Islamic State in 2014.  Some experts in the UAE legal system expressed their hesitancy regarding the recent legal overhaul that relaxed … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS A new book titled Female Religious Authority in Shi’i Islam, which brings together contributions that "reflect[] on the roles that women have played in exercising religious authority across time and space" in Shī'ī Islam, has recently been published.  The UAE issued its first civil law marriage certificate to a non-Muslim … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: Female Religious Authority in Shi’i Islam (Edinburgh University Press, 2021), edited by Mirjam Künkler (Princeton University) and Devin Stewart (Emory University), brings together contributions that "reflect[] on the roles that women have played in exercising religious authority across time and space" in Shī'ī Islam. In "Islam And Democracy: Are They … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: Religious Freedom in the Global South (MDPI Books, 2021), edited by Waheeda Amien (University of Cape Town), brings together articles written by various scholars that investigate "religious freedom in the Global South including the impact of religious freedom on majority and minority religious communities, the relationship between religious freedom and … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Navigating Colonial Law in a 'Sea of Islands'" (Law & Social Inquiry Online (December 3, 2021)), Renisa Mawani (University of British Columbia) reviews Nurfadzilah Yahaya's Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Laws and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). In "Rumi without Islam: the cultural appropriation of Rumi" (Bayt Al … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Petitioning the Sultan: Protests and Justice in Late Ottoman Sultan" (Bloomsbury 2021), Yuval Ben-Bassat (University of Haifa) discusses the institution of petitioning the Ottoman sultan, specifically Abdulhamid II, as a legal remedy in Ottoman Palestine. Abhishek Gupta (Indian Law Institute) discusses Indian Muslims' demand for interest-free Islamic banking in … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Malaysia's Deputy Prime Minister responsible for religious affairs stated that a group of Malaysian imāms who are refusing to receive the coronavirus vaccine will undergo a counseling session that will explain the importance of vaccination. The Iraqi government announced that it will allow up to 40,000 foreigners to participate in the Shī'ī pilgrimage to Karbala … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

"Despite the emergency situation facing Iraq due to the coronavirus pandemic, the people's faith in Imam Hussein means they are not afraid" said one pilgrim in Karbala (Iraq) who had travelled there to commemorate the martyrdom of Hussein, the grandchild of the Prophet, on the day of  'Āshūrā - a commemorative event for Shī'ī Muslims … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

By Kristina L. Richardson For centuries the Sunnī Mālikī madhhab has predominated among Muslims of northern and western Africa, but before the 12th century, Shīʿī, Khārijī, and Ibāḍī legal schools vied for dominance.[1] Merchants living under the Ibāḍī Rustamids (779-909, capital in Tāhart) and in independent Khārijī states in the western Maghrib, such as the … Continue reading Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

By Intisar Rabb This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in a short post, also by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Introduction* We’ve all … Continue reading Islamic Legal Canons as Memes