Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The rejected plan for the Muslim call to prayer to be broadcast via loudspeakers from Peterborough's (UK) mosque will be reconsidered, after it was revealed that the city council website had published a different application on its website when it announced the rejection. 14-year-old volleyball player Najah Aqeel, who had been denied from competing in … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Measuring interpretive authority: a methodological reflection

By Irene K. F. Kirchner (Georgetown University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Measuring interpretive authority: a methodological reflection

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The recording of the 4th Islamicate Digital Humanities Network (IDHN) Conference is now available online. The presents include Suphan Kirmizialtin (NYU Abu Dhabi): Handwritten-Text-Recognition for Arabic Script: A Case Study in Ottoman Turkish; Sofia Tsourlaki  (SOAS University of London): When digital forms of information become a reliable source of academic research; Ken Chitwood (Freie Universität … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The Impact of Islamic Judicial Review in Pakistan  

By Zubair Abbasi Since its beginning in 1979, Islamic judicial review was unlikely to cause major constitutional and legal changes because of its inherent design to maintain the status quo. This can be explained by a number of factors. Firstly, the Federal Shariat Court (FSC) did not have jurisdiction over the provisions of the Constitution. … Continue reading The Impact of Islamic Judicial Review in Pakistan  

Islamic Constitutionalism in Pakistan: Does it Matter?

Pakistan came into being through a constitutionally governed election when Muslims in British India voted for an independent state that comprised the Muslim-majority parts of India. It had two wings: East Pakistan (currently Bangladesh) and West Pakistan, geographically separated by more than a thousand kilometers. Since Islam was the only common link between the two … Continue reading Islamic Constitutionalism in Pakistan: Does it Matter?

Commentary :: The US, the UK, and the Model of Competitive Equality

This commentary, by SHARIAsource U.A.E. and Malaysia editor Paul Lee, examines the U.S. and the U.K. as an example of a model of competitive equality for the regulation of sharīʿa compliance in Islamic finance. The regulation of Islamic finance has generally been an area to which Western jurisdictions have devoted limited attention, and courts and regulators have … Continue reading Commentary :: The US, the UK, and the Model of Competitive Equality

Commentary :: Malaysia and the Centralized Model of Islamic Finance Regulation

UAE and Malaysia editor Paul Lee's commentary examines Malaysia as an example of a centralized model of regulating sharīʿa compliance in Islamic finance. When parties seek to engage in Islamic finance in a jurisdiction, that jurisdiction must make a determination as to whether, and how, to regulate Islamic finance. Beyond those issues arising in conventional finance, … Continue reading Commentary :: Malaysia and the Centralized Model of Islamic Finance Regulation

Circulaire Bank al-Maghrib

This is a memorandum (circulaire) issued by the shari'a board of the Central Bank of Morocco (Bank al-Maghrib) in January 2017. The document contains fatwās pertaining to Islamic financial instruments such as murābaḥa and regulations concerning its practice and penalties. See document and see the interview with a sharīʿa auditor at Dar Assafaa.

Interview :: Islamic Finance: New Developments in Morocco’s Sharīʿa-Compliant Banking

Interview conducted by Ari Schriber, Morocco Editor Nour-Eddine Qaouar is a PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Letters and Humanities at Muhammad V University (Rabat, Morocco) where he studies the applicability of finance-related fatwās from classical sharīʿa to contemporary questions of Islamic finance. He is also Sharīʿa Auditor at Dar Assafaa, the Islamic window of … Continue reading Interview :: Islamic Finance: New Developments in Morocco’s Sharīʿa-Compliant Banking

Review :: Fadel on the Function of the “Interest Ban” in Islamic Finance

Student editor Alicia Daniel reviews Mohammad H. Fadel, Ribâ, Efficiency and Prudential Regulation: Preliminary Thoughts, 25 Wisconsin Journal of International Law 655 (2008). Islamic finance creates financial products specifically aimed at Muslims that are sharīʿa compliant. Many scholars have condemned Islamic finance for condemning ribā (interest) on the one hand, particularly where usurious, but then many others have … Continue reading Review :: Fadel on the Function of the “Interest Ban” in Islamic Finance