Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The recording of the 4th Islamicate Digital Humanities Network (IDHN) Conference is now available online. The presents include Suphan Kirmizialtin (NYU Abu Dhabi): Handwritten-Text-Recognition for Arabic Script: A Case Study in Ottoman Turkish; Sofia Tsourlaki  (SOAS University of London): When digital forms of information become a reliable source of academic research; Ken Chitwood (Freie Universität … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

By Omar Farahat It is common knowledge that substantive Islamic laws are constituted of juristic pronouncements (aḥkām) on a wide range of actions, abstentions, and their possible consequences. Internally, we might say, these pronouncements of the jurists assume a sense of authority given their relation to divine revelation. The pronouncements or rulings of the jurists … Continue reading A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan

The NYT reports on a radical figure in Afghanistan who uses what mainstream scholars of Islamic law around him call novel and excessively harsh interpretations of Islamic criminal law or “sharī'a” to dole out punishments and gain support from locals who incorrectly think these harsh interpretations have religious or historical precedent. This same figure also … Continue reading New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. All roundups can be found at this link. Religious communities use digital tools, such as Zoom, to host services, lead … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Through the writings of eminent classic and contemporary Islamic jurists, Ayesha Shahid explores the development of As-Siyar (Islamic international law) within the Islamic legal tradition in "An Exploration of the ‘Global’ History of International Law: Some Perspectives from within the Islamic Legal Traditions," International Law and Islam. The author attempts to address the existing gaps in the global history of the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup