Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Islam through Objects" (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021), Anna Bigelow (ed.) (Stanford University) curates a collection of essays on objects in Islam and how these objects, including, for example, prayer beads, rugs, amulets, clothing, shed light on what the author terms "Islamic material culture studies." In "Violence in Early Islam: Religious … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS After retiring from the NBA, Hakeem Olajuwon launched a successful career in real estate, all the while avoiding borrowing money for his acquisitions that would result in paying or charging interest, which contradicts his faith. Al Barakeh Wheat - a project founded by two Jordanians - teaches people how to … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "The Textual Evolution of the Ottoman Şeyhülislams’ Fetvas: A Cross-Corpora Computational Analysis" (Der Islam 98, no. 2 (2021)), Bogac Ergene (The University of Vermont) and Atabey Kaygun (Istanbul Technical University) "use a mix of computational techniques to identify textual shifts in the Ottoman şeyhülislams’ fetvas between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries." In … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Islamic fintech, or iFintech, witnessed considerable growth recently, with Malaysia described as "the most robust ecosystem supporting the industry." Online and mobile-first fintech companies, sometimes called "neobanks," are increasingly offering sharī'a-compliant services, in a move to accommodate the needs of their Muslim clientele. While many Afghans continue to fear the … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Following the Taliban's rise to power, many law students and lawyers from Afghanistan have reported that "[i]t is not the application of Islamic criminal law that frightens [them], it is that it is applied without due process." Haroun Rahimi, a self-exiled Afghan who was a professor of law at Kabul … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

By Mehdi Berriah This is part four in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. As noted by Ibrāhīm b. ʿAlī al-Hanafī al-Ṭarsūsī, the possibility of resorting to the imposition of new taxes or the requisition, on the order of the sultan, of goods to finance a war effort … Continue reading A Lack of Resources in the bayt al-māl: A Sine Qua Non Condition for the Imposition of a Tax?

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News: Nailah Dean, writer and activist, has introduced her "ISMS Project," comprising a series of images to demonstrate what she terms the "Muslim Marriage Crisis" in an age of "digital, hyper-visual time" that represent sexism, ageism, racism, and colorism. The project represents, in addition to these four "-isms," the Muslim woman's … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Leading scholars of Islamic law, including Editor-in-Chief, Professor Intisar Rabb, were invited by the University of Bergen for a roundtable on "the use and usefulness of the concepts of canonization and codification in Islamic legal studies." The panels on canonization and codification, respectively, were held online and can be accessed here. "Sharia Law in the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

By Mehdi Berriah This is part three in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. In the cases presented in the sources discussed in the previous post, sultans and amīrs met, in general, with firm opposition on the part of several ʿulamāʾ to the imposition of additional taxes on … Continue reading The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law

The United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan, and the Taliban's subsequent takeover of the country has brought, once again, Islam and Islamic law to the fore in recent news coverage, reports, and analyses. This renewed attention to Islamic law is in part due to the fact that the Taliban identifies itself as a Muslim military organization … Continue reading Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law