Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Are the Limitations on Remedies Fair? A Comparative Study between the US Law and Islamic Law" (SSRN, May 18, 2021), Fahad Aldossary (Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law) discusses how US and Islamic laws situate and understand the legal concepts of "foreseeability, causation, mitigation, and certainty." In "Mapping The Common Law Concept … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Finance Guru, a UK-based Islamic finance platform, recently raised £3 million in investments. The Saudi Crown Prince's overhaul of the country's legal system and practices traditionally thought as being mandated by sharī'a has given rise to discontent among some of the population. Ahead of the national Islamophobia summit, the National Council of Canadian Muslims … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Mohammad Fadel

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Prof. Mohammad Fadel entitled "Form, Function and Historical Development of Mukthasars in Post-Mamluk Islamic Law," delivered on February 24, 2021 at 11am (EST), 5pm (Münster) 7pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor Fadel’s lecture described the history, purpose, and nature of late medieval Mālikī mukhtaṣars. … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Mohammad Fadel

Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

By Intisar Rabb This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in a short post, also by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Introduction* We’ve all … Continue reading Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

By Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Two … Continue reading The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

Measuring interpretive authority: a methodological reflection

By Irene K. F. Kirchner (Georgetown University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Measuring interpretive authority: a methodological reflection

Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

By Haider A. Hamoudi (University of Pittsburgh) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The recording of the 4th Islamicate Digital Humanities Network (IDHN) Conference is now available online. The presents include Suphan Kirmizialtin (NYU Abu Dhabi): Handwritten-Text-Recognition for Arabic Script: A Case Study in Ottoman Turkish; Sofia Tsourlaki  (SOAS University of London): When digital forms of information become a reliable source of academic research; Ken Chitwood (Freie Universität … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

By Omar Farahat It is common knowledge that substantive Islamic laws are constituted of juristic pronouncements (aḥkām) on a wide range of actions, abstentions, and their possible consequences. Internally, we might say, these pronouncements of the jurists assume a sense of authority given their relation to divine revelation. The pronouncements or rulings of the jurists … Continue reading A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan

The NYT reports on a radical figure in Afghanistan who uses what mainstream scholars of Islamic law around him call novel and excessively harsh interpretations of Islamic criminal law or “sharī'a” to dole out punishments and gain support from locals who incorrectly think these harsh interpretations have religious or historical precedent. This same figure also … Continue reading New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan