Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Some pundits have argued that the recent presidential campaign in France, and the candidates' statements about Islam "that seek[] to protect laïcité and regulate Islam contradictorily entangle[] state and religion ever closer." "Al-Azhar Grand Imam Ahmed al-Tayyeb announced that congratulating Christians on holidays is not out of courtesy or formalities … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan inaugurated a madrasa at Ayasofya, two years after the site was converted into a mosque. For more content and context on Ayasofya's conversion from a museum into a mosque, consult our "Recent Case Roundup: On the Turkish Decision on Hagia Sofia." Forty people were reported … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Petitioning the Sultan: Protests and Justice in Late Ottoman Sultan" (Bloomsbury 2021), Yuval Ben-Bassat (University of Haifa) discusses the institution of petitioning the Ottoman sultan, specifically Abdulhamid II, as a legal remedy in Ottoman Palestine. Abhishek Gupta (Indian Law Institute) discusses Indian Muslims' demand for interest-free Islamic banking in … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "On Sacred Land" (Minnesota Law Review, vol. 105 (2021)), Khaled A. Beydoun (Wayne State University Law School) discusses America's "Anti-Sharia Movement" within the context of the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Person's Act, highlighting the resistance local governments exhibit against the creation of mosques and other Islamic community centers across the country. In "Women … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

As talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban continue, the US peace envoy to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalizad's proposal circulated to both parties includes "a High Council for Islamic Jurisprudence," to advise ordinary courts as to matters involving the interpretation of Islamic law. Austrian Muslims have planned to sue the Austrian government under the leadership … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls, accusing the competing ḥalāl restaurant of trademark infringement. Four alleged white supremacists who are accused of anti-Muslim violence, among other charges, can face charges based on the Anti-Riot Act of 1968, a federal appeals court ruled. Iran's Expediency Council, tasked with settling disagreements between the parliament … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Research on Islamic corporate social responsibility and Islamic bank disclosures" (Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, 2021) Ardi Gunardi (Universitas Pasundan) and colleagues examine the corporate social responsibility disclosures made in the Islamic banking and finance sector, with a focus on board structure, ownership structure, CEO power, and what they term "shariah governance." Challenging … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: In November 2009, Switzerland passed a popular initiative prohibiting the construction of minarets. In response, Mr. Ouardiri, a Muslim living in Switzerland, challenged … Continue reading A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

The Irony of Sharī’a Bans: Part II

By Haider Ala Hamoudi My previous post explained the problems surrounding the enforceability in U.S. courts of the Islamic mahr—the nuptial payment that a groom or his family must provide to a bride to conclude the marriage. This post addresses the manner in which U.S. courts analyze the mahr in light of these problems. It … Continue reading The Irony of Sharī’a Bans: Part II

The Irony of Sharī’a Bans: Part I

By Haider Ala Hamoudi The most common criticism of legislative attempts to ban the “creeping” of sharī'a into United States Courts is that they serve no actual purpose.  That is, courts do not decide cases on the basis of sharī'a, and therefore banning it does not serve any legitimate purpose, nor could it have any … Continue reading The Irony of Sharī’a Bans: Part I