Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part one in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. Many students of Islamic history are fascinated by the unusual polity that ruled Egypt, Syria, and neighboring regions from about 1250 to 1517 CE. This political entity was dominated by a small elite group … Continue reading Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News: Nailah Dean, writer and activist, has introduced her "ISMS Project," comprising a series of images to demonstrate what she terms the "Muslim Marriage Crisis" in an age of "digital, hyper-visual time" that represent sexism, ageism, racism, and colorism. The project represents, in addition to these four "-isms," the Muslim woman's … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islam and Data Science Roundup

On March 25, 2021, Elie Wardini (Stockholm University) gave a lecture entitled "The Road to the Quran Keyword Database," which discusses Wardini's comprehensive analysis of keywords in context of the lexicon of the Qur'ān contrasted to the lexicon of Ibn Hisham’s Sira.

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Islamic Studies in Australia’s Higher Education Sector" (The Australian Journal of Islamic Studies 6, no. 2 (2021)), Adis Duderija (Griffith University) and Jessica Mamone (Griffith University) collect any discuss data from 2017 on the state of substantive Islamic studies courses taught at top Australian universities. In "Civilised or Savage: The Effect of Colonialism’s Dichotomus … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Four Historical Strategies for Approaching Early Islamic Law

By Elizabeth Urban (West Chester University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Four Historical Strategies for Approaching Early Islamic Law

Islam and Data Science Roundup

Facebook selected Junaid Qadir, Professor at the Information Technology University of Punjab and Amana Raquib, Assistant Professor at the Institute of Business Administration, Karachi as winners of Facebook’s Ethics in AI Research Initiative for the Asia Pacific. This initiative aims to foster groundbreaking academic research in the field of AI ethics. Qadir, the Principal Investigator (PI) of the project stated “‘In … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 22nd

Joseph Lowry, Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, was interviewed last month by FactCheck.org regarding a viral Facebook post which showed U.S. Congresswoman Ilhan Omar alongside distorted quotations from the Qurʾān. Lowry explained how "some of the interpretations given in the meme are mistranslated, and all of them are … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 22nd

Contemporary Primary Sources: Open Letter to ISIS from Muslim Scholars

In 2004, 126 Islamic scholars from around the world published an open letter “to the fighters and followers of the self-declared ‘Islamic State,'” rejecting the religious justification for their violence. In particular, they sought to demonstrate how ISIS’ leaders were “cherry-picking” verses from the Qurʾān and how they were ignoring Islamic legal and ethical standards. … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Open Letter to ISIS from Muslim Scholars

REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))

Guest contributor Haider Hamoudi reviews Professor Intisar Rabb's, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, new article in the Suffolk Law Review entitled Against Kadijustiz: On the Negative Citation of Foreign Law. Rabb focuses on how American courts have utilized inaccurate portrayals of "qāḍī justice" as antitheses to American court procedures. Hamoudi notes that this point is all the more important when one … Continue reading REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))